Summer of discontent in the independence movement

‘For many on the independence side this is all a bit of a let down, but instead it should be seen as a challenge and window. Scotland’s journey to greater self-government isn’t all about the SNP. Nor is it about keeping quiet and burying any reservations until Independence Day.’

More devo or less devo?

It is likely, therefore, that the UK Government will retain the key powers indefinitely and devolve only cautiously. It seems unlikely that the UK Government will transfer them all back or that the Welsh proposal for joint policymaking will be adopted.

The first Sceptical Scot public debate

This would have beenl the first of a Sceptical Scot series exploring what kind of Scotland we are and want to become…What kind of Scotland we become tomorrow requires a clear and honest look in the mirror today. Come and help us shine a light by taking part in an open, generous and non-partisan conversation.

What’s holding them back?

“Holyrood is an incredibly powerful Parliament with the ability to make a real positive difference to the lives of people in Scotland. Sadly, it is not in the interests of those who value independence above all else to use these powers to their full effect. The powers they need must always be those they don’t have. It is the only way their constitutional obsession can be achieved.”

Conventional wisdom: Brexit, devolution and Sewel

“It is inevitable that the balance of power between the devolved and central governments will shift, with more power going to the former, unless the UK government actively chooses what Welsh First Minister Carwyn Jones has described as a ‘land grab’ “. The Sewel implications of the UK Supreme Court judgment.

Don’t count on more powers post-Brexit

“If the UK Parliament, as part of the UK government’s ‘Great Repeal Bill’ measure, decides it wishes to amend the Scotland Act to specify that all, or some, of the powers returned from the EU will be reserved to Westminster, it has the power to do that.”

Unanswered questions of Scotland’s economy

Derek Mackay’s first budget as finance secretary is assailed from all sides – even his own. Scottish Conservatives label Scotland the highest-taxed part of the UK; Labour’s Kezia Dugdale endorses higher Scottish taxes as part of a federal-style devolution of revenue-raising powers. Leading economist David Eiser pondered deeper economic issues.