Scottish fast-track to the EU

“There is considerable political goodwill to Scotland in EU capitals since it is facing Brexit despite having voted to remain. That political goodwill, on current trends, is likely to feed into an effort to fast-track Scotland’s EU membership in the event of a successful independence vote.”

Conventional wisdom: Brexit, devolution and Sewel

“It is inevitable that the balance of power between the devolved and central governments will shift, with more power going to the former, unless the UK government actively chooses what Welsh First Minister Carwyn Jones has described as a ‘land grab’ “. The Sewel implications of the UK Supreme Court judgment.

The English question resurfaces

“For the kinds of free trade arrangements which many Brexiteers appear to favour are exactly the forces that have opened up the chasms between capital city and provinces, and between the networked and the ‘left behind’ which have done so much to bring a disaffected, political Englishness into being.”

Time to reject May’s absurd adventurism

“The notion that it ought to be the people who are sovereign, rather than parliament, has a long and proud history in Scotland.” “Scotland can either stick with the result of the 2014 referendum or it can respect the result of the 2016 referendum. It cannot do both.”

Politically savvy and nigh impossible

“For Scotland to meet the obligations of EEA-EFTA membership, almost all areas of policy would have to be devolved – immigration, business regulations, employment law, competition policy, product standards to name just a few. This would not be a revision of the devolution settlement; it would be accomplishment of de facto independence via a murky and technical back door.”

Devo max, #indyref2 or holding op?

“Sturgeon’s paper is a serious in-depth piece of analysis. It respects the original Scottish Parliament vote by 92-0…The Scottish Government has followed up and respected that vote – but the politics has moved on. A differentiated deal for Scotland looks highly unlikely. And while the ball is now in May’s court – it is likely to be back in Sturgeon’s very soon.

Grand coalition ready for Brexit

“Theresa May’s refusal to bring a bill to the Commons or to publish a White Paper on Brexit has been an extraordinary rejection of basic democratic accountability and debate.” But: “84% of MPs at Westminster voted to set the UK on a rapid path to Brexit, with the Tory government of the day supported by the main Labour opposition.”

The Press attacks the rule of law

“Theresa May has other problems to confront. The court ruling has emboldened the opposition and is likely to unite them around a ‘soft-Brexit’ line – wanting to keep Britain in the single European market, or at least the EU customs union.”

UK gives up foreign policy influence post-Brexit

Kirsty Hughes that at a time of major global and European challenges, the UK’s decision to sideline itself and retreat into mercantilism, is an act of folly with ramifications that are much bigger than the narrower question of whether or not the UK keeps access to the EU’s single market.